April thoughts...

Here we are in April already! The days do seem to fly by sometimes.

I’m presently the organizer of a Meetup group in the Los Angeles area called “Wholesome Queers”

I didn’t create the group or name it, but the creator asked if I’d take it over when he chose to embark on a new adventure on the East Coast. But it has proven to be a very popular name. We are nearly up to 1200 members now – though I should be quick to say that most will probably never show up for an event… tis the way of Meetup groups, and I belong to groups myself to which I’ll never actually show up for more than a stray event. But the Wholesome Queer events are well attended. It has truly been an honor to spend time with such a diverse group of people. I’ve learned a lot, and there honestly has not been a single person in the group I’ve not enjoyed meeting and am richer for even the slight acquaintance.

Much has been written of what is called an epidemic of loneliness in our times. I don’t think it is just the US. It seems to be connected to the changing economics in the world. People leave home and try to make their way… perhaps they find a romantic partner… maybe they don’t. Sometimes people by desire or need live a great distance from their families and don’t feel support from those quarters. But I don’t think that this is endemic to our age. People have been moving elsewhere to find work from the beginning of recorded history. And loneliness is perhaps part of a normal cycle of being human. We all feel lonely at times. Whether partnered or not. Even in the midst of a big family and many loved ones, we all have times when we feel alone. We can label it a bad thing, or we can choose to see it as a reflective period… a time to consider what we want our days to be like. Where do we need to make change? What do we need to appreciate more?

Life is a craft project. To some extent we can choose to change our circumstances IF they warrant change. If you want more friends you need to step outside your front door and meet people who share your interests. Even if you have an obscure interest like underwater basket-weaving, it is not impossible that someone in your community also wants to give it a go. There is much to be said for actively creating a life that you want to live. Finding something that you love to do is always a great place to start.

April Reading

The Purple Fantastic Book of the Month

The Ballad of Crow & Sparrow

This classic western adventure/romance has train robberies, shoot-outs, robber hideouts and more. The scope is epic and the two men at its center are very specific individuals and easy to care about.

* * * * *

Sometimes a man’s biggest blunder can turn into his greatest triumph.

Orphaned at fourteen, Crow Poulin now has to hunt and trap the White Mountains of Arizona, as his father had taught him, all alone. It’s a lonely existence, until one morning, while checking his trap line, Crow finds more than a rabbit in a snare. He stumbles across the outlaw Jack Wittington lying half dead in the wilds. He takes the wanted man in, heals him, and in return for saving his life, the smooth-talking criminal invites Crow to join his family. Starved for human interaction and a father figure, Crow leaves the mountains behind for what he assumes will be a brighter future.

Six years pass. Crow is now a man, as well as a member of the Wittington Gang. He may be considered an outlaw, but his father’s morals are warring loudly with the lifestyle of his adopted family. When the gang decides to rob a train, Crow has no choice but to go along to keep a tight rein on the more bloodthirsty members. It doesn’t take long for the scheme to go horribly astray.

Instead of gold-filled coffers, the gang finds Spencer Haughton, son of cattle baron and railroad tycoon Woodford Haughton, cowering in the family’s opulent private car. The outlaws grab the sickly heir in hopes of ransoming him off.

Things then go from bad to worse for them when the law rides down on the Wittington hideout and Crow is given Spencer to hide until the ransom is paid. The pretty young man is nothing at all like anyone Crow has ever met before. Delicate, refined, well-educated, and possessed of a singing voice to rival the songs of the birds in the trees, Crow slowly finds himself falling for the winsome rich boy. But can two such opposite souls find the love they’re both seeking in each other’s arms?

The Purple Fantastic Steam rating gives this a 3.5 out of 5. It gets steamy at times, but always in service to story and character development. 

Description

Sometimes a man’s biggest blunder can turn into his greatest triumph.

Orphaned at fourteen, Crow Poulin now has to hunt and trap the White Mountains of Arizona, as his father had taught him, all alone. It’s a lonely existence, until one morning, while checking his trap line, Crow finds more than a rabbit in a snare. He stumbles across the outlaw Jack Wittington lying half dead in the wilds. He takes the wanted man in, heals him, and in return for saving his life, the smooth-talking criminal invites Crow to join his family. Starved for human interaction and a father figure, Crow leaves the mountains behind for what he assumes will be a brighter future.

Six years pass. Crow is now a man, as well as a member of the Wittington Gang. He may be considered an outlaw, but his father’s morals are warring loudly with the lifestyle of his adopted family. When the gang decides to rob a train, Crow has no choice but to go along to keep a tight rein on the more bloodthirsty members. It doesn’t take long for the scheme to go horribly astray.

Instead of gold-filled coffers, the gang finds Spencer Haughton, son of cattle baron and railroad tycoon Woodford Haughton, cowering in the family’s opulent private car. The outlaws grab the sickly heir in hopes of ransoming him off.

Things then go from bad to worse for them when the law rides down on the Wittington hideout and Crow is given Spencer to hide until the ransom is paid. The pretty young man is nothing at all like anyone Crow has ever met before. Delicate, refined, well-educated, and possessed of a singing voice to rival the songs of the birds in the trees, Crow slowly finds himself falling for the winsome rich boy. But can two such opposite souls find the love they’re both seeking in each other’s arms?

Additional information

book-author

V.L. Locey

Format

Kindle Books, Paperback

Language

English

Publisher

self

Pages

264

Year Published

2021

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