February thoughts...

February. 

When I was in elementary school, February brought rain, candy hearts, and those little paper valentine’s cards. I remember that everyone gave a valentine to all the other kids in one’s class. By the end of the day, I came home with quite a stack of those cute little cards that we punched out of large paper books. Or sometimes they’d come in little boxes. At least that’s how I remember it… everyone got a valentine so that no one would feel left out.

I still love the creativity of those little cards. There was a bit of competition to see who could find the funniest cards. As kids we didn’t recognize the dysfunction that was presented to us as love. We were told that romance is something that we can’t live without.

We all had this underlying assumption that someday we’d find our valentine and our happy-ever-after. Part of our programming. Along with songs on the radio, every TV show, most books, every movie, we learned that our life would be complete on that big day. The fateful day that we’d see that person on the other side of the room and we’d know! That would be the person that we’d spend our happy-ever-after with. Naturally it went without saying that this person would be of the opposite gender.

So the months passed, the years passed… and some of us figured out that the object of our affection might be someone of the same gender – someone who our parents might not expect or be happy with. But we dealt with that eventually. We went out on dates. We met strings of lovely people… but the lightning strike never quite happened. The click. The twitterpation that leads to something beyond twitterpation.

Maybe we’ve had short relationships that never lasted. But ultimately we all have to discover – whether in a relationship or out, that we need to be our own valentine. Happy-Ever-After is something we choose for ourselves on a daily basis. Being attached does not guarantee happiness. Yes, of course it is a beautiful thing to connect. And it is a beautiful thing to particularly connect to one special person. But our lives are surrounded with wonderful people if we choose to see them. And I have to remember that like my child self, I can metaphorically hand out valentines to all the people in my life and let them know that they are valued. Love is something that we can give and receive freely.

Happily Ever After has to be crafted, like any art project. We have the ability to work with what we’ve got, to make it work for us. I believe it begins in loving what IS. Not being complacent, but in being content.

February Reading

The Purple Fantastic Book of the Month

Widdershins (Whyborne & Griffin #1)

This is a great series. HP Lovecraft meets X Files and a steamy relationship between two very specific men, which in 1898 was a great risk. A well crafted mystery and gothic horror work to create a book that is very difficult to put down, and definitely pulls the reader towards the next book. Each book has a stand alone mystery/adventure at its core, but cumulatively a larger story arc drives the entire series.

* * * * *

A reclusive scholar. A private detective. And a book of spells that could destroy the world.

Love is dangerous. Ever since the tragic death of the friend he adored, Percival Endicott Whyborne has ruthlessly suppressed any desire for another man. Instead, he spends his days studying dead languages at the museum where he works. So when handsome ex-Pinkerton Griffin Flaherty approaches him to translate a mysterious book, Whyborne wants to finish the job and get rid of the detective as quickly as possible.

Griffin left the Pinkertons after the death of his partner. Now in business for himself, he must investigate the murder of a wealthy young man. His only clue: an encrypted book that once belonged to the victim.As the investigation draws them closer, Griffin’s rakish charm threatens to shatter Whyborne’s iron control. But when they uncover evidence of a powerful cult determined to rule the world, Whyborne must choose: to remain safely alone, or to risk everything for the man he loves.

Widdershins is the first novel in the Whyborne & Griffin series (11 books), where magic, mystery, and m/m romance collide with Victorian era America.

The Purple Fantastic Steam Meter gives this a 4. This tale gets very steamy, but the sex scenes mostly do not lose sight of the story. 

More about The Purple Fantastic Steam Meter on the About page.

Description

A reclusive scholar. A private detective. And a book of spells that could destroy the world.

Love is dangerous. Ever since the tragic death of the friend he adored, Percival Endicott Whyborne has ruthlessly suppressed any desire for another man. Instead, he spends his days studying dead languages at the museum where he works. So when handsome ex-Pinkerton Griffin Flaherty approaches him to translate a mysterious book, Whyborne wants to finish the job and get rid of the detective as quickly as possible.

Griffin left the Pinkertons after the death of his partner. Now in business for himself, he must investigate the murder of a wealthy young man. His only clue: an encrypted book that once belonged to the victim.As the investigation draws them closer, Griffin’s rakish charm threatens to shatter Whyborne’s iron control. But when they uncover evidence of a powerful cult determined to rule the world, Whyborne must choose: to remain safely alone, or to risk everything for the man he loves.

Widdershins is the first novel in the Whyborne & Griffin series, where magic, mystery, and m/m romance collide with Victorian era America.

Additional information

book-author

Jordan Hawke

Format

Audiobook, Hardcover, Kindle Books, Paperback

Language

English

Pages

224

Publisher

CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

Year Published

2013

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